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Information Cycle

As information ages, you will find it in different sources.

Information Timeline

  

Research Process

1. UNDERSTAND ASSIGNMENT 

  • What is the assignment?
  • What are the required elements?
  • What is the scope of the assignment?
  • What type of document am I writing? (argumentative, narrative, analytical, expository papers or visual presentation?)

2. FORMULATE A TOPIC

  • Explore and narrow your topic
  • Brainstorm - identify the keywords for your topic
  • Find background information

3. SEARCH FOR INFORMATION

  • What type (books, articles, images, reports, studies, statistics, primary sources, government documents etc.) of information do I need?
  • How much information do I need? - depends on length of paper and time you are given
  • Consult different types of access tools (library catalog, databases, websites etc.)
  • Read critically and take notes
  • Manage information sources (Use NOODLE TOOLS)

4. EVALUATE YOUR SOURCES (CRAP method handout)

  • Currency
  • Reliability       
  • Authority
  • Purpose 

5. ORGANIZE YOUR IDEA AND INFORMATION

6. DRAFT THE PAPER

7. REVISE, EDIT, and DESIGN YOUR PAPER

8. CITE YOUR SOURCES

  • Which citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago)?
  • Create your reference list (Use NOODLE TOOLS) 

Image source: San Diego Christian Collge Libguides "Research Process"

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Need Help?

McEntegart Library Provides:

  • One-on-One Research Consultations with a Librarian
  • Faculty-Requested Instruction for a Specific Class or Project

Email: bklibrary@sjcny.edu

Phone: 718-940-5880

SJC Libraries Online Tutorials

Peer Review

A peer reviewed or "scholarly" article is one in which a group of experts in the same field examines the research or ideas in the article to determine if it meets the standards to be published in an academic journal.

Primary & Secondary Sources

Primary Source: An item created during the time period studied, such as diaries, letters, government records, interviews, pictures/film and art.

Examples:

  • The Diary of Anne Frank
  • The Constitution of Canada
  • A journal article reporting NEW findings

Secondary Source: An item which interprets a primary source, such as textbooks, newspapers, magazines and encyclopedias.

Examples:

  • A article which interprets or reviews PREVIOUS findings
  • A history textbook
  • A book ABOUT the effects of WWI

Research Worksheet

Take Research Notes